JMIR Perioperative Medicine

Technologies for pre- and post-operative education, preventative interventions, and clinical care for surgery and anaesthesiology patients, as well as informatics applications in anesthesia, surgery, critical care, and pain medicine

Editor-in-Chief:

John F Pearson, MD, University of Utah School of Medicine


JMIR Perioperative Medicine (JPOP, Editor-in-chief: John F. Pearson MD, University of Utah School of Medicine) is an open access journal focusing on technologies, medical devices, apps, engineering, informatics and patient education for perioperative medicine and nursing, including pre- and post-operative education, preventative interventions and clinical care for surgery and anaesthesiology patients, as well as informatics applications in anesthesia, surgery, critical care and pain medicine.

We are read by clinicians and patients alike and have (as all JMIR journals) a focus on readable and applied science reporting the design and evaluation of health innovations and emerging technologies. We publish original research, viewpoints, and reviews (both literature reviews and medical device/technology/app reviews).

JMIR Perioperative Medicine features a rapid and thorough peer-review process, professional copyediting, professional production of PDF, XHTML, and XML proofs.

The journal is indexed in PubMed and PubMed Central.

During a limited period of time, there are no fees to publish in this journal. 

Submit your paper today!

Recent Articles

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Mobile tools for surgery and perioperative medicine

Mobile health (mHealth) apps are becoming increasingly common in surgical practices for training, education, and communication. Factors leading to increased delays, morbidity, and mortality in surgery include inadequate preoperative patient preparation due to a failure to identify patients and procedure details, and missing instruments and equipment required for the procedure. Many apps are available for supporting preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative care. However, there is a lack of studies that assess the quality of apps that act as surgical preparatory guides.

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Mobile tools for surgery and perioperative medicine

Despite the importance of their perspectives, end users (eg, patients, caregivers) are not typically engaged by academic researchers in the development of mobile health (mHealth) apps for perioperative cardiac surgery settings.

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Patient Education for Surgery and Anesthesiology

The majority of American adults search for health and illness information on the internet. However, the quality and accuracy of this information are notoriously variable. With the advent of social media, US individuals have increasingly shared their own health and illness experiences, including those related to bariatric surgery, on social media platforms. Previous research has found that peer-to-peer requesting and giving of advice related to bariatric surgery on social media is common, that such advice is often presented in stark terms, and that the advice may not reflect patient standards of care. These previous investigations have helped to map bariatric surgery content on Facebook and YouTube.

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Postoperative Monitoring and Telemonitoring

The Enhanced Recovery After Surgery (ERAS) protocol has been recently extended to hepatopancreatobiliary (HPB) surgery, with excellent outcomes reported. Early mobilization is an essential facet of the ERAS protocol, but compliance has been reported to be poor. We recently reported our success in a 6-month clinical practice improvement program (CPIP) for early postoperative mobilization. During the COVID-19 pandemic, we experienced reduced staffing and resource availability, which can make CPIP sustainability difficult.

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Artificial Intelligence in Surgery and Perioperative Medicine

Capnography is commonly used for nurse-administered procedural sedation. Distinguishing between capnography waveform abnormalities that signal the need for clinical intervention for an event and those that do not indicate the need for intervention is essential for the successful implementation of this technology into practice. It is possible that capnography alarm management may be improved by using machine learning to create a “smart alarm” that can alert clinicians to apneic events that are predicted to be prolonged.

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Perioperative social and emotional support

The rapid spread of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) has presented immeasurable challenges to health care workers who remain at the frontline of the pandemic. A rapidly evolving body of literature has quantitatively demonstrated significant psychological impacts of the pandemic on health care workers. However, little is known about the lived experience of the pandemic for frontline medical staff.

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Postoperative Monitoring and Telemonitoring

Many promising telemedicine innovations fail to be accepted and used over time, and there are longstanding questions about how to best evaluate telemedicine services and other health information technologies. In response to these challenges, there is a growing interest in how to take the sociotechnical complexity of health care into account during design, implementation, and evaluation. This paper discusses the methodological implications of this complexity and how the sociotechnical context holds the key to understanding the effects and outcomes of telemedicine. Examples from a work domain analysis of a surgical setting, where a telemedicine service for remote surgical consultation was to be introduced, are used to show how abstracted functional modeling can provide a structured and rigorous means to analyze and represent the implementation context in complex health care settings.

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Mobile tools for surgery and perioperative medicine

Surgical audit is an essential aspect of modern reflective surgical practice and is key to improving surgical outcomes. The surgical logbook is an important method of data collection for both personal and unit audits; however, current electronic data collection tools, especially mobile apps, lack the minimum recommended data fields.

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Perioperative Infection Control and Prevention

What does the COVID-19 false-negative exposure problem mean in the context of a local anesthesia practice? We present a customizable online calculator designed to quantify and better understand individual and aggregate provider exposure risk.

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Reviews

Monitoring surgical recovery has traditionally been confined to metrics measurable within the hospital and clinic setting. However, commercially available mobile sensors are now capable of extending measurements into a patient’s home. As these sensors were developed for nonmedical applications, their clinical role has yet to be established. The aim of this systematic review is to evaluate the relationship between data generated by mobile sensors and postoperative outcomes.

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Postoperative Monitoring and Telemonitoring

Patients undergoing esophagectomy are at serious risk of developing postoperative complications. To support early recognition of clinical deterioration, wireless sensor technologies that enable continuous vital signs monitoring in a ward setting are emerging.

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Preprints Open for Peer-Review

There are no preprints available for open peer-review at this time. Please check back later.

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