JMIR Perioperative Medicine

Technologies for pre- and post-operative education, preventative interventions, and clinical care for surgery and anaesthesiology patients, as well as informatics applications in anesthesia, surgery, critical care, and pain medicine

Editor-in-Chief:

John F Pearson, MD, University of Utah School of Medicine


JMIR Perioperative Medicine (JPOP, Editor-in-chief: John F. Pearson MD, University of Utah School of Medicine) is an open access journal focusing on technologies, medical devices, apps, engineering, informatics and patient education for perioperative medicine and nursing, including pre- and post-operative education, preventative interventions and clinical care for surgery and anaesthesiology patients, as well as informatics applications in anesthesia, surgery, critical care and pain medicine.

We are read by clinicians and patients alike and have (as all JMIR journals) a focus on readable and applied science reporting the design and evaluation of health innovations and emerging technologies. We publish original research, viewpoints, and reviews (both literature reviews and medical device/technology/app reviews).

JMIR Perioperative Medicine features a rapid and thorough peer-review process, professional copyediting, professional production of PDF, XHTML, and XML proofs.

The journal is indexed in PubMed and PubMed Central.

During a limited period of time, there are no fees to publish in this journal. 

Submit your paper today!

Recent Articles

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Mobile tools for surgery and perioperative medicine

Surgical audit is an essential aspect of modern reflective surgical practice and is key to improving surgical outcomes. The surgical logbook is an important method of data collection for both personal and unit audits; however, current electronic data collection tools, especially mobile apps, lack the minimum recommended data fields.

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Perioperative Infection Control and Prevention

What does the COVID-19 false-negative exposure problem mean in the context of a local anesthesia practice? We present a customizable online calculator designed to quantify and better understand individual and aggregate provider exposure risk.

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Reviews

Monitoring surgical recovery has traditionally been confined to metrics measurable within the hospital and clinic setting. However, commercially available mobile sensors are now capable of extending measurements into a patient’s home. As these sensors were developed for nonmedical applications, their clinical role has yet to be established. The aim of this systematic review is to evaluate the relationship between data generated by mobile sensors and postoperative outcomes.

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Postoperative Monitoring and Telemonitoring

Patients undergoing esophagectomy are at serious risk of developing postoperative complications. To support early recognition of clinical deterioration, wireless sensor technologies that enable continuous vital signs monitoring in a ward setting are emerging.

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Postoperative Rehabilitation

The clinical benefits of enhanced recovery programs (ERPs) have been extensively researched, but few studies have evaluated their cost-effectiveness. Our ERP for open liver resection is based closely on the guidelines produced by the Enhanced Recovery After Surgery Society (2016). This study follows on from a previous randomized controlled trial. We also undertook a long-term follow-up of the patients enrolled in the original trial alongside an analysis of the associated health economics.

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Postoperative Pain Management

The frequency and timing of assessing patient symptoms and discomfort during postoperative recovery are goals. Therefore, real-time recovery evaluation has been suggested to identify specific deficits in patient recovery.

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Postoperative Monitoring and Telemonitoring

Hospital stays after major surgery are shorter than ever before. Although enhanced recovery and early discharge have many benefits, some complications will now first manifest themselves in home settings. Remote patient monitoring with wearable sensors in the first days after hospital discharge may capture clinical deterioration earlier but is largely uncharted territory.

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New and Emerging Methods and Tools in Surgery and Anaesthesiology

The American College of Surgeons reports 88,320 intraoperative needlestick injuries (NSIs) per year, resulting in US $376 to US $2456 in costs per NSI. Engineered sharps injury prevention (ESIP) devices protect against NSIs. To our knowledge, no study has been published to date to demonstrate clinical effectiveness of an intraoperative ESIP device. Operative Armour is a wearable arm cuff that can be donned during surgical closure to allow surgeons to keep a suture pack and sharps protection container on their forearm.

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Postoperative Monitoring and Telemonitoring

Hernia repairs account for millions of general surgical procedures performed each year worldwide, with a notable shift to outpatient settings over the last decades. As technical possibilities such as smartphones, tablets, and different kinds of probes are becoming more and more available, such systems have been evaluated for applications in various clinical settings. However, there have been few studies conducted in the surgical field, especially in general surgery.

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Patient Education for Surgery and Anesthesiology

There is a great unmet clinical need to provide patients undergoing spinal surgery and their caregivers with ongoing, high-quality care before and after surgery in an efficiency-focused health care environment.

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Mobile tools for surgery and perioperative medicine

Picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) are ubiquitously used to store, share, and view radiological information for preoperative planning across surgical specialties. Although traditional PACS software has proven reliable in terms of display accuracy and ease of use, it remains limited by its inherent representation of medical imaging in 2 dimensions. Augmented reality (AR) systems present an exciting opportunity to complement traditional PACS capabilities.

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