JMIR Perioperative Medicine

Technology and data science for interdisciplinary innovation to improve care delivery and surgical patient outcomes.

Editor-in-Chief:

Nidhi Rohatgi, MD, MS, SFHM, Stanford University, USA


JMIR Perioperative Medicine is a global, peer-reviewed, open access journal indexed in PubMed, PubMed CentralDirectory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ Seal), SCOPUS, EBSCO/EBSCO Essentials and Sherpa/Romeo.

We welcome contributions from diverse specialties impacting the care of surgical patients, such as, surgery, anesthesiology, general medicine, physiatry, nursing, allied health professionals, experts in artificial intelligence (AI), digital health technology, and also from informaticians, scientists, clinical trialists, health service researchers, quality improvement champions, or subspecialists (e.g., cardiologists, hematologists, pulmonologists) involved in Perioperative Medicine research. 

We accept original research, reviews (literature reviews and app/technology/wearable review), viewpoints, tutorials, research letters, quality improvement studies and observational studies.

JMIR Perioperative Medicine adheres to rigorous quality standards, involving a rapid and thorough peer-review process, professional copyediting, and professional production of PDF, XHTML, and XML proofs.

Recent Articles

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Patient Monitoring and Anesthesia Information Management Systems

Osteoarthritis is a significant cause of disability, resulting in increased joint replacement surgeries and health care costs. Establishing benchmarks that more accurately predict surgical duration could help to decrease costs, maximize efficiency, and improve patient experience. We compared the anesthesia-controlled time (ACT) and surgery-controlled time (SCT) of primary total knee (TKA) and total hip arthroplasties (THA) between an academic medical center (AMC) and a community hospital (CH) for 2 orthopedic surgeons.

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Qualitative Studies, Thematic Studies, Surveys in Perioperative Medicine

Major surgery on patients with anemia has demonstrated an increased risk of perioperative blood transfusions and postoperative morbidity and mortality. Recent studies have shown that integrating preoperative anemia treatment as a component of perioperative blood management may reduce blood product utilization and improve outcomes in both cardiac and noncardiac surgery. However, outpatient management of anemia falls outside of daily practice for most anesthesiologists and is probably weakly understood.

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Editorial

JMIR Perioperative Medicine supports the dissemination of technological and data science–driven innovative research conducted by interdisciplinary teams in perioperative medicine. We invite contributions on a broad range of topics from clinicians, scientists, and allied health professionals from across the globe.

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Outcomes Research in Perioperative Medicine

The Royal College of Surgeons Basic Surgical Skills (BSS) course is ubiquitous among UK surgical trainees but is geographically limited and costly. The COVID-19 pandemic has reduced training quality. Surveys illustrate reduced logbook completion and increased trainee attrition. Local, peer-led teaching has been shown to be effective at increasing confidence in surgical skills in a cost-effective manner. Qualitative data on trainee well-being, recruitment, and retention are lacking.

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Artificial Intelligence in Surgery and Perioperative Medicine

The minimally invasive nature of thoracoscopic surgery is well recognized; however, the absence of a reliable evaluation method remains challenging. We hypothesized that the postoperative recovery speed is closely linked to surgical invasiveness, where recovery signifies the patient’s behavior transition back to their preoperative state during the perioperative period.

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Postoperative Monitoring and Telemonitoring

Enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) protocols are patient-centered, evidence-based guidelines for peri-, intra-, and postoperative management of surgical candidates that aim to decrease operative complications and facilitate recovery after surgery. Anesthesia providers can use these protocols to guide decision-making and standardize aspects of their anesthetic plan in the operating room.

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Patient Education for Surgery and Anesthesiology

More than 300 million patients undergo surgical procedures requiring anesthesia worldwide annually. There are 2 standard-of-care general anesthesia administration options: inhaled volatile anesthesia (INVA) and total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA). There is limited evidence comparing these methods and their impact on patient experiences and outcomes. Patients often seek this information from sources such as the internet. However, the majority of websites on anesthesia-related topics are not comprehensive, updated, and fully accurate. The quality and availability of web-based patient information about INVA and TIVA have not been sufficiently examined.

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Artificial Intelligence in Surgery and Perioperative Medicine

Although machine learning models demonstrate significant potential in predicting postoperative delirium, the advantages of their implementation in real-world settings remain unclear and require a comparison with conventional models in practical applications.

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Postoperative Rehabilitation

Prescription opioid misuse risk is disproportionate among veterans; military veterans wounded in combat misuse prescription opioids at an even higher rate (46.2%). Opioid misuse is costly in terms of morbidity, mortality, and humanitarian and economic burden and costs the Civilian Health and Medical Program of the Department of Veterans Affairs more than US $1.13 billion annually. Preventing opioid misuse at the time of prescription is a critical component in the response to the opioid crisis. The CPMRx mobile app has been shown to decrease the odds of opioid misuse during the postoperative period.

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Perioperative Pediatric Care

Anesthesiologists require an understanding of their patients’ outcomes to evaluate their performance and improve their practice. Traditionally, anesthesiologists had limited information about their surgical outpatients’ outcomes due to minimal contact post discharge. Leveraging digital health innovations for analyzing personal and population outcomes may improve perioperative care. BC Children’s Hospital’s postoperative follow-up registry for outpatient surgeries collects short-term outcomes such as pain, nausea, and vomiting. Yet, these data were previously not available to anesthesiologists.

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Postoperative Monitoring and Telemonitoring

Wireless vital sign sensors are increasingly being used to monitor patients on surgical wards. Although early warning scores (EWSs) are the current standard for the identification of patient deterioration in a ward setting, their usefulness for continuous monitoring is unknown.

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Mobile tools for surgery and perioperative medicine

High-risk alcohol use is a common preventable risk factor for postoperative complications, admission to intensive care, and longer hospital stays. Short-term abstinence from alcohol use (2 to 4 weeks) prior to surgery is linked to a lower likelihood of postoperative complications.

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