JMIR Perioperative Medicine

Technologies for pre- and post-operative education, preventative interventions, and clinical care for surgery and anaesthesiology patients, as well as informatics applications in anesthesia, surgery, critical care, and pain medicine

Editor-in-Chief:

John F Pearson, MD, University of Utah School of Medicine


JMIR Perioperative Medicine (JPOP, Editor-in-chief: John F. Pearson MD, University of Utah School of Medicine) is an open access journal focusing on technologies, medical devices, apps, engineering, informatics and patient education for perioperative medicine and nursing, including pre- and post-operative education, preventative interventions and clinical care for surgery and anaesthesiology patients, as well as informatics applications in anesthesia, surgery, critical care and pain medicine.

We are read by clinicians and patients alike and have (as all JMIR journals) a focus on readable and applied science reporting the design and evaluation of health innovations and emerging technologies. We publish original research, viewpoints, and reviews (both literature reviews and medical device/technology/app reviews).

JMIR Perioperative Medicine features a rapid and thorough peer-review process, professional copyediting, professional production of PDF, XHTML, and XML proofs.

The journal is indexed in PubMed and PubMed Central.

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Recent Articles

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Postoperative Monitoring and Telemonitoring

Preoperative telemonitoring of vital signs, physical activity, and well-being might be able to optimize prehabilitation of the patient’s physical and mental condition prior to surgery, support setting alarms during in-hospital monitoring, and allow personalization of the postoperative recovery process.

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Perioperative Pediatric Care

The perioperative period is a data-rich environment with potential for innovation through digital health tools and predictive analytics to optimize patients’ health with targeted prehabilitation. Although some risk factors for postoperative pain following pediatric surgery are already known, the systematic use of preoperative information to guide personalized interventions is not yet widespread in clinical practice.

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Original Papers

Patients with early breast cancer undergoing primary surgery, who have low axillary nodal burden, can safely forego axillary node clearance (ANC). However, routine use of axillary ultrasound (AUS) leads to 43% of patients in this group having ANC unnecessarily, following a positive AUS. The intersection of machine learning with medicine can provide innovative ways to understand specific risks within large patient data sets, but this has not yet been trialed in the arena of axillary node management in breast cancer.

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Neurosurgery

Digital health solutions have been shown to enhance outcomes for individuals with chronic medical illnesses, but few have been validated for surgical patients. The digital health platform ManageMySurgery (MMS) has been validated for spine surgery as a feasible method for patients along their surgical journey through in-app education and completion of patient-reported outcomes surveys.

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Original Papers

Postoperative complications following cardiac surgery are common and represent a serious burden to health services and society. However, there is a lack of consensus among experts on what events should be considered as a “complication” and how to assess their severity.

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Original Papers

The automated acquisition of intraoperative patient temperature data via temperature probes leads to the possibility of producing a number of artifacts related to probe positioning that may impact these probes’ utility for observational research.

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Perioperative Pediatric Care

Tonsillectomy is a common pediatric surgical procedure performed in North America. Caregivers experience complex challenges in preparing for their child’s surgery and coordinating care at home and, consequently, could benefit from access to educational resources. A previous feasibility study of Tonsil-Text-To-Me, an automated SMS text messaging service that sends 15 time-sensitive activity reminders, links to nutrition and hydration tips, pain management strategies, and guidance on monitoring for complications, showed promising results, with high levels of caregiver satisfaction and engagement.

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Original Papers

Long-term postoperative pain (POP) and patient responses to pain relief medications are not yet fully understood. Although recent studies have developed an index for the nociception level of patients under general anesthesia based on multiple physiological parameters, it remains unclear whether these parameters correlate with long-term POP outcomes.

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Original Papers

Although the various advantages of clinical information systems in intensive care units (ICUs), such as intensive care information systems (ICISs), have been reported, their role in preventing medical errors remains unclear.

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Postoperative Monitoring and Telemonitoring

Electronic patient portal (EPP) use is associated with lower no-show rates and increased patient satisfaction. However, there are disparities in enrollment into these communication platforms.

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Viewpoints

Although the presence of medical societies on social networks (SNs) could be interesting for disseminating professional information, there is no study investigating their presence on SNs.

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Preprints Open for Peer-Review

There are no preprints available for open peer-review at this time. Please check back later.

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